St Edmund, Costessey 

St Edmund’s has a rather curious tower which sits awkwardly at the church’s western end. The top section is constructed in brick and houses the church bells. Unusually, the tower does not extend much beyond the apex of the nave and was once topped by a much larger wooden spire which was replaced with the current spirelet in 1930.  

As you enter St Edmund’s you are met by a 19th century screen that divides the western end of the church from the nave. Here you will find the 14th century octagonal stone font which is decorated with shields on each of its facets and a number of curious faces. 

The nave has a simple charm to it, with some nice examples of poppy head benches and large windows of clear glass. The carved wooden pulpit, along with the pews, were installed in the 19th century and were originally located at the now redundant church of St Michael at Booton. The aisle is paved with a number of ledger stone

stones, and in the chancel can be found those belonging to the Jerningham family of nearby Costessey Hall.

The chancel is separated from the nave by the original medieval rood screen, which received a colourful repaint as part of the 19th century renovations. These works were overseen by James William Evans, the vicar of the parish for 51 years and who died in 1896. The east window is dedicated to his memory and depicts Christ flanked by Saint Edmund and Saint Giles.

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